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eISSN: 1643-3750

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High-affinity IgG to a major A. fumigatus allergen, Asp f 2, retards allergic response.

Elena V. Svirshchevskaya, Natalya Viskova, Marina Shevchenko, Ludmila Alekseeva, Alexei Marchenko, Sergei Benevolensky, Viswanath P. Kurup

Med Sci Monit 2004; 10(10): BR371-380

ID: 11780


BACKGROUND: Allergic diseases represent a major health threat to humans. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the significant approaches to the treatment of IgE-mediated allergy and its control. The mechanisms involved in SIT-induced responses are complex and still speculative. Immunological events associated with successful SIT include an increase in allergen-specific "blocking" IgG, reduction in cytokine production, and induction of regulatory or suppressor cells. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of SIT using a single major allergen of A. fumigatus, Asp f 2, or its dominant B-cell epitope, aa254-268, in a murine model of allergic aspergillosis. It is known that A. fumigatus (Af), a ubiquitous fungus, is implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of clinically different allergic diseases. MATERIAL/METHODS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized with Asp f 2, its proteolytic fragments or the recombinant peptide aa254-268 to induce high-affinity IgG to Asp f 2. Allergy to Af was induced by subcutaneous and intranasal immunization of previously SIT-treated animals with an Af crude extract. RESULTS: The results of immunological and lung histological studies demonstrate a simultaneous increase in Asp f 2-specific IgG and amelioration of allergic inflammatory symptoms in mice immunized with Asp f 2 or its peptides before exposure to Af crude allergen. CONCLUSIONS: Thus it was shown that the induction of IgG specific to major allergens or even to their B-cell epitopes induces protection from allergy provoked by natural allergens.

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